Churches view on gays

churches view on gays


The country's parliament voted through the new law on same-sex marriage by a large majority, making it mandatory for all churches to conduct gay marriages.

The far-Right Danish People's Party mounted a strong campaign against the new law, which nonetheless passed with the support of 85 of the country's 111 MPs.

"Marriage is as old as man himself, and you can't change something as fundamental," the party's church spokesperson Christian Langballe said during the debate. "Marriage is supposed to be between a man and a woman."

The first gay marriages will take place as soon as June 15. This contrasts with neighbouring Norway, where bishops are still debating the correct 'ritual' for the ceremonies, four years after a 2008 parliamentary vote in favour of gay marriage.

"We have felt a little like we were living in the Middle Ages," he told Denmark's TV2 station. "I think it is positive that there is now a majority for it, and that there are so many priests and bishops who are in favour of it, and that the Danish population supports up about it. We have moved forward. It's 2012."

List of Christian denominational positions on homosexuality

churches view on gayschurches view on gays

This month, 253 Catholic leaders, including heads of national bishops’ conferences, heads of the Eastern Catholic churches and lay married couples, met at the Vatican to discuss how the church can better support and guide families.

This first meeting of the “Extraordinary Synod on the Family” discussed tough issues like cohabitation and divorce. It also treated gay people as family members, not just political problems.

The bishops heard the story of one Catholic family’s decision to welcome the son’s male partner, and the draft of the synod’s “relatio” (summary document) included startlingly positive language about gay couples.

But the final version offered only a repetition of the church’s opposition to gay marriage and a chilly exhortation to “pastoral attention to people of homosexual orientation.” Even this couldn’t get a two-thirds majority of bishops.

The bishops divided into two camps: those who think the church must focus on opposing all family structures that don’t follow Catholic sexual ethics, and those who think it must acknowledge the good done by gay couples. Neither is entirely right. Neither offers gay people a place within the church.

The country's parliament voted through the new law on same-sex marriage by a large majority, making it mandatory for all churches to conduct gay marriages.

The far-Right Danish People's Party mounted a strong campaign against the new law, which nonetheless passed with the support of 85 of the country's 111 MPs.

"Marriage is as old as man himself, and you can't change something as fundamental," the party's church spokesperson Christian Langballe said during the debate. "Marriage is supposed to be between a man and a woman."

The first gay marriages will take place as soon as June 15. This contrasts with neighbouring Norway, where bishops are still debating the correct 'ritual' for the ceremonies, four years after a 2008 parliamentary vote in favour of gay marriage.

"We have felt a little like we were living in the Middle Ages," he told Denmark's TV2 station. "I think it is positive that there is now a majority for it, and that there are so many priests and bishops who are in favour of it, and that the Danish population supports up about it. We have moved forward. It's 2012."

(CNN) - Pope Francis said the church has the right to express its opinions but not to "interfere spiritually" in the lives of gays and lesbians, expanding on explosive comments he made in July about not judging homosexuals.

In a wide-ranging interview published Thursday, the pope also said that women must play a key role in church decisions and brushed off critics who say he should be more vocal about fighting abortion and gay marriage.

Moreover, if the church fails to find a "new balance" between its spiritual and political missions, the pope warned, its moral foundation will "fall like a house of cards."

The interview, released by Jesuit magazines in several different languages and 16 countries on Thursday, offers perhaps the most expansive and in-depth view of Francis' vision for the Roman Catholic Church.

Elected in March with the expectation that he would try to reform the Vatican, an institution that many observers say is riven by corruption and turf wars, Francis said his first mission is to change the church's "attitude."

Many denominations have differing views on homosexuality. The Pentecostal Movement has its own views. What is the position of the Pentecostal Movement about homosexuality?

Most churches in the Pentecostal Movement view homosexuality as a sin. They tend to oppose same-sex marriages, and they do not allow homosexual pastors. Some pentecostal churches also deny membership to homosexuals. They take the perspective that the homosexual can be delivered from their homosexuality.

As the largest Pentecostal denomination in the U.S., the Assemblies of God also adhere to the belief that homosexuality is a sin, and that it goes against scripture and the God's created order for human relationships. They believe that homosexuals will not inherent the Kingdom of God, but that homosexuals can be reconciled to God. AG churches encourage members to minister to homosexuals.

This is a list of Christian denominational positions on homosexuality . The issue of homosexuality and Christianity is a subject of on-going theological debate within and between Christian denominations and this list seeks to summarise the various official positions. Within denominations, many members may hold somewhat differing views on and even differing definitions of homosexuality . The list is in alphabetical order and includes denominations self-identified as Christian, which may not be so recognized by the other denominations.

The Seventh-day Adventist Church is opposed to same-sex sexual practices and relationships on the grounds that "sexual intimacy belongs only within the marital relationship of a man and a woman." It believes the Bible consistently affirms the pattern of heterosexual monogamy, and all sexual relations outside the scope of spousal intimacy are contrary to God's original plan. [1]

In response to several controversies in the Episcopal Church, among which was its changed policies relating to sexual morality, a number of alternative Anglican churches were founded during the 1960s and 1970s. They are customarily referred to as the churches of the Continuing Anglican movement .

In 2008, conflict in the worldwide Anglican Communion over the issue of the acceptance of homosexuality, the appointment of Bishop Gene Robinson in the Episcopal Church in the USA, and a growing concern about the ambivalent position of the Anglican mother church in the UK led to the founding of a global network of conservative Anglican churches representing more than two thirds of Anglicans throughout the world. [6] This is the Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans (FCA).

The Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) was formed in 2009 as yet another conservative alternative to the Episcopal Church. It and the Continuing Anglican churches are primarily made up of people who left the Episcopal Church, partially in opposition to its approval of homosexual relationships and gay clergy.

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